How to Reactivate the Natural Spiraling Motion of Your Feet

Sydney Video Training 9 Comments

Something I learned from one of my favorite teacher in the world is to teach a feeling within an exercise as opposed to just teaching an exercise.

You see, if I can teach you a feeling that you can identify with when you walk out of the studio door, you’re much more likely to embody the concept and make it a permanent part of your day to day life.

Marie-José Blom frequently says, “For the body, feeling is knowing.”

That’s my goal with the exercise in today’s video, to teach you the feeling of your foot spiral. It also happens to be a great exercise for your feet.

And in case you’re interested, here’s a little more technical information about your foot spiral.

When you’re walking and you take a step, your heel is normally first to land. If your foot spiral is intact, your heel bone rocks forward like a little rocker sending you to your cuboid bone, located on the outside back edge of your foot.

The cuboid itself is suspended and doesn’t actually touch the ground, but the area of your foot right below your cuboid is the first point of your foot spiral.

Your second point is your first ray, located between your first and second toe knuckles. If you take a look at your foot and draw a line from your cuboid to your first ray, that’s a long diagonal line from point A to point B, with nothing touching down in between.

The third point to touch down is your fifth ray, located behind your little toe knuckle.

Together, optimally from your first ray and your fifth ray, you push off to take your next step.

Illustration of Cuboid, First Ray, and Fifth Ray of the foot

As you can see, it’s a pretty complex chain of events that happen very quickly with every step you take. That’s why slowing the process down and learning the feel of the foot spiral can help you sense if it’s happening and more easily embody it if it’s not.

Make sure you do one foot and then get up and walk around before practicing the other side and note any differences you feel between the feet and in your overall gait and posture.

I’d love to hear what you discover in the comments below.

See you in the studio,
Sydney

About the Author

Sydney

Hi, I'm Sydney and I'm a Restorative Movement Specialist here at Pilates Tonic. My goal is to empower you with tools to connect and live in your body in new and better ways.I'm a passionate advocate for wellness through optimally aligned movement and I look forward to designing a customized alignment and movement program just for you! If you want to find out more, just give me a call at 423.702.5233, or email me at info@pilatestonic.com. See you in the studio!

Comments 9

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  1. You’re videos are giving me faith! I have worn orthotics for several years, when they broke I started walking without them and my arch collapsed in the left foot, and it’s all stretched out. The foot dr told me surgery was next, but of course I am trying to avoid this. They say where there’s a will there’s a way. Let’s hope! Thank you

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      1. Thank you so much Sydney!! I was unable to find the link to register for the Foot Workshop. Once I get to the page, it says that registration is no longer available. Would you happen to have a more direct link? I would LOVE to try it. Thank you!!

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  2. Excellent videos! Wondering if you happen to have anything related to plantar fasciitis? Been suffering from this for just over a year and have tried many different therapies with no solution. Any suggestions?

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      Author

      Thanks for your feedback and question! You may have already tried exercises similar to these, but just in case you haven’t here’s a few you could try:

      https://www.pilatestonic.com/2014/this-foot-exercise-will-actually-release-muscles-from-head-to-toe/

      https://www.pilatestonic.com/2015/if-you-wear-shoes-you-need-this-calf-stretch/

      https://www.pilatestonic.com/2014/my-favorite-exercise-for-increasing-ankle-mobility-and-releasing-the-soles-of-your-feet/

      Something else to notice is where the weight is in your feet when you’re standing. If your weight is more forward to the front of your feet, backing up your weight into your heels can go a long way to helping prevent recurring plantar fasciitis. You also might like to check out the guys over at http://www.thefootcollective.com/.

      Hope this helps!

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